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Blog

February 4, 2017
matthewmcrae
These days, it seems like everyone is talking about Viola Desmond. She’s been on a postage stamp. She’s had her own Heritage Minute and we named her as one of five women who should be household names in Canada. She’s even had a ferryboat in Halifax, Nova Scotia, named after her. Last but not least...
January 28, 2017
Lyndsay.Manaigre
Each year on January 28, Data Privacy Day is celebrated by various countries, corporations, privacy professionals and citizens. The purpose of Data Privacy Day is to raise awareness about the public’s right to privacy, to consider how present-day technologies impact privacy rights, and to highlight...
January 24, 2017
javier.torres
My name is Javier Torres. Two years ago I moved to Winnipeg and became a Program Interpreter at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights. When I started working at the Museum, many of my friends in Quebec City wanted to know: Why did you choose to work at a museum for human rights in Winnipeg? I came...
January 24, 2017
matthewmcrae
Our new travelling exhibition, 1867: Rebellion & Confederation, explores the 30 years of Canadian history that culminated in Canadian confederation. This blog series will share the stories and artifacts found inside our 1867 exhibition. In the process, I think you’ll see that Canada’s past is...
January 4, 2017
Remi.Courcelles
From Africa to Asia to the Americas, women artisans are forming cooperatives. Whether they are weavers, painters, embroiderers or jewelry makers, they are finding strength and building a brighter future through collaborative businesses that they own and manage as a group. Empowering Women: Artisan...
December 15, 2016
matthewmcrae
I have a confession to make: For five summers, from 1996 until 2000, I was paid to dress up as a Father of Confederation. I was part of a troupe of actors who would wear period costumes while giving walking tours and speaking with tourists about Canadian history. Now that you know about my old...
December 14, 2016
Karine.Duhamel
In my last blog, I discussed what I like to call the “nuts and bolts of reconciliation” – the way that the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) has sought to host public performances and offer programs focused on the concept of sharing difficult truths about the treatment of Indigenous peoples...
December 1, 2016
matthewmcrae
Jim Derksen was only six years old when he – along with 9,000 other Canadians – was struck by the polio epidemic of 1953.1 Derksen survived an`1d has been using a wheelchair for personal mobility ever since then. Derksen has worked with disability rights organizations here in Canada and across the...
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