Skip to main content

Grades 9-12

A view from the top – Unit plan

Help your students dig deeper into local and global human rights stories while discovering how different groups have inspired change for human rights.

A smiling woman on the alabaster ramps of the Museum.

“A view from the top” is a three‐lesson unit plan to accompany the Virtual Museum Tour: A view from the top. This unit introduces students to inspiring human rights stories and how these stories motivated people to take action for human rights.

The lessons included in this unit plan are cross‐curricular and encourage students to read, write, research, and communicate ideas about inspiring change for human rights. 

  1. Explore:

  2. Respond:

    • Briefly summarize the virtual tour. Where did you stop? What stories did you hear? What part of the tour was most interesting to you?
  3. Dig deeper:

    • Dig deeper into the story of Maréshia Rucker. Her story is found in the Inspiring Change gallery on Level 7 but was not featured in this tour.
  4. Respond:

    • Why is Maréshia Rucker’s story featured in a gallery called Inspiring Change?
    • What was Maréshia advocating for? What tools did she use to inspire others to support her cause? What were the lasting effects of her actions?
    • In your community, what barriers do you see to making sure everyone can participate in community events? What actions need to be taken to begin breaking down these barriers?

Lesson 2: Music as inspiration

  1. Refresh:

    • While watching the Virtual Museum Tour: A view from the top, you visited an area in the Inspiring Change gallery on Level 7 called the listening stations. Here you briefly heard about how music can and has been used as a tool to inspire people to take action for human rights. To review, please go to 4:20 in the video.
  2. Reflect:

    • Has music ever changed your point of view?
  3. Respond:

    • What is the connection between music and human rights?
    • Of all the songs featured in this article, which one had the greatest impact on you? What was the message behind this song and why was it so impactful?
  4. Research:

    Do some research into a song which was not featured in this article that has, or is currently having, a positive impact on human rights. Then respond to the following questions.

    • What song did you choose and why?
    • What is the main message behind the song?
    • How has this song made a positive impact on human rights?

Lesson 3: Inspiring change in your community

  1. Refresh:

    • The final stop in the Virtual Museum Tour: A view from the top took you to the Israel Asper Tower of Hope. Here you briefly heard about a variety of locations in Winnipeg, such as Main Street, St. Boniface and the Exchange District, where action for human rights took place. Today you will have the chance to learn the history behind one of these locations and do some research into the action for human rights that has taken place – or is taking place – in your own neighbourhood. To review, please go to 7:15 in the video.
  2. Reflect:

    • Do you think people are taking action for human rights in your community?
  3. Explore:

  4. Respond:

    • When did this strike take place and what rights were being fought for?
    • What brought people together and motivated them to take action for their rights?
    • What were the lasting impacts of these events?
  5. Research:

    Do some research into human rights activism that is taking or has taken place in your community. Then respond to the following questions.

    • What action for human rights has taken place – or is taking place – in your community? What motivated this action?
    • Where do you see a need for human rights activism in your community?
    • How might you get involved or motivate others to take an interest in this cause?