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New national museum an inspiration that must be seen: visitor survey

News release details

Visitors to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) are overwhelmingly satisfied with their experience, with 94% rating themselves as "very satisfied" or "satisfied" in a visitor survey conducted for the CMHR. Four in five visitors rated the Museum an inspiration, while over nine in 10 visitors felt the CMHR should be seen by as many people as possible.

"In the tourism industry, visitor satisfaction numbers this high are exceptional," said Economic Development Winnipeg President and CEO, Marina James. "Visitor satisfaction is a key measure for tourist and destination locations. The higher the satisfaction, the more likely they are to recommend the destination to others, and the more likely they will come back for another visit."

Survey results showed that 26% of CMHR visitors came from outside the province, with 21% arriving from other Canadian provinces, 4% from the U.S. and 1% from other countries. Ninety-two per cent of visitors surveyed indicated they were likely to recommend the CMHR to others, while more than three-quarters of those who live within a two-hour drive of Winnipeg said they would "definitely" or "probably" return within the next 12 months.

"This survey demonstrates that the Museum is connecting our visitors with human rights in meaningful ways," said CMHR interim President and CEO Gail Stephens. "The Museum will build on this early success, continuing to engage our visitors in human rights stories, programming and exhibition content."

Nearly nine in 10 visitors surveyed felt moved by what they saw and read at the CMHR, nearly eight in 10 gained a greater appreciation of Canada's role in the field of human rights, and seven in 10 left the CMHR feeling more empathy towards others.

Nearly 500 people participated in the survey, which was conducted by Quorus Consulting Group over nine days during the winter of 2014–15.

From September 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015, the CMHR welcomed 212,000 visitors through ticketed admission, booked events and customized programs, memberships, public programming, and visits to the Boutique and ERA Bistro. This figure includes the 45,000 people who visited during the busy month of September, including opening ceremonies, public preview tours, and third-party facility rentals. In just seven months, the CMHR came close to reaching the annual visitation target of 250,000.

The CMHR remains a sought-after venue for functions, receptions and seminars. The Museum hosted an average of 1.8 events per day from September 1, 2014 to March 31, 2015.

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is the first museum in the world solely dedicated to the evolution, celebration and future of human rights. Using multimedia technology and other innovative approaches, the CMHR creates inspiring encounters with human rights for all ages, in a visitor experience unlike any other.

Rick Nadeau, MBA, CMRP
President, Quorus Consulting Group Inc.
Ph: 613–837-4064
rick@quorusconsulting.com

Snapshot of visitor survey results

Quorus Consulting Group conducted the visitor survey from December 26, 2014 to January 4, 2015 (with the exception of December 29, 2014, when the Museum was closed). A total of 474 surveys were completed and collected on site. A team of professionally trained interviewers distributed electronic devices loaded with the questionnaire to visitors while at the exit area of the Museum. The survey was available in both English and French. Staff and volunteers were not eligible to participate.

  • Visitor satisfaction – 94% of visitors are either "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with their experience at the Museum. Visitors are very likely to recommend the Museum to others and the vast majority of those who live within a two-hour drive of Winnipeg intend to return for another visit within the next 12 months.
  • Motivation to visit – More than one-third of visitors say general interest or curiosity encouraged them to visit the Museum. The architecture of the building was a key draw for some, while others were motivated to see the Museum's content.
  • Describing the visit – At least four in five visitors rated the Museum as "informative," "accessible," "straightforward to understand," "relevant (matters to me)," "inspiring" and "balanced."
  • Impact on visitors – Over nine in 10 visitors left the Museum amazed by its architecture and feeling that the Museum should be seen by as many people as possible. Nearly nine in 10 felt moved by what they saw and read at the Museum, nearly eight in 10 gained a greater appreciation of Canada's role in the field of human rights, and seven in 10 left the Museum feeling more empathy towards others.
  • Future intentions – A majority of visitors (76%) reported that they will discuss human rights with others and many will become more involved in human rights as a result of their experiences at the Museum. For example, 31% of visitors said they will make changes in their own lives to support human rights as a result of visiting the Museum and 25% said they would become more involved in a human rights-related cause or initiative.

Media contacts

Rhea Yates