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The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is located on ancestral lands, on Treaty 1 Territory. The Red River Valley is also the birthplace of the Métis. We acknowledge the water in the Museum is sourced from Shoal Lake 40 First Nation.

Topics: Human rights promotion

Stories

Nursing and Indigenous peoples’ health: reconciliation in practice

By Maureen Fitzhenry

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A group of Indigenous women nurses stand together outside.

Star Trek and human rights

By Murray Leeder and Alana Conway

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A humanoid alien stands next to a wall.

From refugee to firefighter

By Maureen Fitzhenry

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A smiling man stands in front of a fire truck.

Graphic truths

By Stephen Carney

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The covers of many graphic novels.

Dick Patrick: An Indigenous veteran’s fight for inclusion

By Jason Permanand and Steve McCullough

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A snow-covered country road with mountains in the background.

Jody Williams and the campaign to ban landmines

By Julia Peristerakis

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A woman sitting on a chair with hands clasped looks thoughtfully ahead, as if answering a question.

Travis Price’s act of kindness

By Julia Peristerakis

Tags for Travis Price’s act of kindness

Six teenagers and a middle-aged woman stand with their arms around each other and are smiling for the camera. They are all wearing pink shirts.

Stories

Nursing and Indigenous peoples’ health: reconciliation in practice

By Maureen Fitzhenry

Nurses’ long‐time partnership shows that decolonizing our health care systems is necessary for enhancing respect, fairness and social justice for First Nations, Inuit and Métis.

Tags for Nursing and Indigenous peoples’ health: reconciliation in practice

A group of Indigenous women nurses stand together outside.

Star Trek and human rights

By Murray Leeder and Alana Conway

Star Trek has offered an intelligent, socially conscious approach to science fiction since it debuted in 1966. Current Star Trek series feature complex, nuanced perspectives on important human rights matters such as genocide, migrancy and refugees.

A humanoid alien stands next to a wall.

From refugee to firefighter

By Maureen Fitzhenry

Tags for From refugee to firefighter

A smiling man stands in front of a fire truck.

Graphic truths

By Stephen Carney

Tags for Graphic truths

The covers of many graphic novels.

Dick Patrick: An Indigenous veteran’s fight for inclusion

By Jason Permanand and Steve McCullough

Tags for Dick Patrick: An Indigenous veteran’s fight for inclusion

A snow-covered country road with mountains in the background.

Jody Williams and the campaign to ban landmines

By Julia Peristerakis

Tags for Jody Williams and the campaign to ban landmines

A woman sitting on a chair with hands clasped looks thoughtfully ahead, as if answering a question.

Travis Price’s act of kindness

By Julia Peristerakis

Tags for Travis Price’s act of kindness

Six teenagers and a middle-aged woman stand with their arms around each other and are smiling for the camera. They are all wearing pink shirts.