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Indigenous rights

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Events

National book launch: 'Picking up the Pieces'

November 20, 2019

Cost: Free ticket required

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A man wearing traditional Indigenous regalia and headdress stands in front of an art installation made of wooden panels with embedded objects.

Indigenous Perspectives on Reconciliation

Wednesdays, October 16, 23 and 30, 2019

Cost: $90 for members / $100 for non-members + textbook

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A smiling woman faces the camera with her hands on her hips.

Events

National book launch: 'Picking up the Pieces'

November 20, 2019

Cost: Free ticket required

Location: Level 2 - Canadian Journeys

Tags for National book launch: 'Picking up the Pieces'

A man wearing traditional Indigenous regalia and headdress stands in front of an art installation made of wooden panels with embedded objects.

Indigenous Perspectives on Reconciliation

Wednesdays, October 16, 23 and 30, 2019

Cost: $90 for members / $100 for non-members + textbook

Location: CMHR, Manitoba Teachers Society Classrooms on Level 1

Tags for Indigenous Perspectives on Reconciliation

A smiling woman faces the camera with her hands on her hips.

Exhibitions

Truth and Reconciliation

Permanent

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A row of museum display cases with various artifacts inside. A guitar is displayed under glass.  The guitar has a colourful floral print with a bird hand-painted onto its front.

Exhibitions

Truth and Reconciliation

Permanent

Truth and Reconciliation presents the tragic history of Canada’s residential schools and the ongoing efforts to use education and discussion to move towards reconciliation.

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A row of museum display cases with various artifacts inside. A guitar is displayed under glass.  The guitar has a colourful floral print with a bird hand-painted onto its front.

Stories

Peace, friendship and respect

By Karine Duhamel

Tags for Peace, friendship and respect

An image being projected onto a curved wall that is about nine feet tall. It is made up of many small squares and has the appearance of Indigenous bead work or a mosaic. The image is mainly made up of white squares, but it also features two thick blue horizontal lines that run parallel to each other.

Planting a seed: Creating a community garden at the Museum

By Matthew McRae, Communications Advisor

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Seven men and women work in a garden on a sunny day. The garden is circular and has very few plants in it. Around the garden are tall grass, trees, a walking path and a sidewalk. In the background, part of the Museum’s stone structure can be seen.

Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

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A drawn image of a group of people dressed in various garments, both traditional and non-traditional. The person in front is holding up a blank page, meant to symbolize the Declaration.

Truth and reconciliation: What’s next?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

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A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing the carved face of a person with a painted red hand over their mouth.

Lighting the flame

By Rhea Yates, Manager, Digital Outreach

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A man carrying a torch stands on a ladder to light a flame within a copper cauldron.

Approaching the human rights stories of Indigenous peoples

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

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A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing the carved face of a person against a white background.

The nuts and bolts of reconciliation

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

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A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing a painted image of a red hand over a carved mouth.

Why reconciliation? Why now?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

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Carved wooden faces

Reconciliation: A movement of hope or a movement of guilt?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

Tags for Reconciliation: A movement of hope or a movement of guilt?

Carved wooden face

Stories

Peace, friendship and respect

By Karine Duhamel

Tags for Peace, friendship and respect

An image being projected onto a curved wall that is about nine feet tall. It is made up of many small squares and has the appearance of Indigenous bead work or a mosaic. The image is mainly made up of white squares, but it also features two thick blue horizontal lines that run parallel to each other.

Planting a seed: Creating a community garden at the Museum

By Matthew McRae, Communications Advisor

My partner and I have a small garden just outside the front door of our home. I will admit that it’s not much to look at.

Tags for Planting a seed: Creating a community garden at the Museum

Seven men and women work in a garden on a sunny day. The garden is circular and has very few plants in it. Around the garden are tall grass, trees, a walking path and a sidewalk. In the background, part of the Museum’s stone structure can be seen.

Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

On September 13, 2017, people around the world will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Tags for Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

A drawn image of a group of people dressed in various garments, both traditional and non-traditional. The person in front is holding up a blank page, meant to symbolize the Declaration.

Truth and reconciliation: What’s next?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

This article series has focused on the way we present Indigenous content within the Museum and how we are approaching reconciliation.

Tags for Truth and reconciliation: What’s next?

A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing the carved face of a person with a painted red hand over their mouth.

Lighting the flame

By Rhea Yates, Manager, Digital Outreach

Fifty years ago, 10 young Indigenous athletes ran an 800-kilometre relay from St. Paul, Minnesota, to Winnipeg, Manitoba, carrying the torch that would open the 1967 Pan American Games.

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A man carrying a torch stands on a ladder to light a flame within a copper cauldron.

Approaching the human rights stories of Indigenous peoples

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

This article focuses on the creation and development of exhibition content exploring the human rights stories of Indigenous people in this country. To tell these stories, the Museum engaged with communities and individuals in a process of truth-telling.

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A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing the carved face of a person against a white background.

The nuts and bolts of reconciliation

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

As a child, I often visited museums. I was lucky to be able to travel with my family, and to visit interpretive spaces across the country.

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A closeup of a carved wooden box, showing a painted image of a red hand over a carved mouth.

Why reconciliation? Why now?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

Since the publication of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s final report in 2015, more and more Canadians seem focused on the idea of reconciliation.

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Carved wooden faces

Reconciliation: A movement of hope or a movement of guilt?

By Karine Duhamel, Researcher-Curator, Indigenous Content

In Why reconciliation? Why now? I talked about the idea of reconciliation as an invitation to a new and shared future and as a pathway towards a good life, both for Indigenous people and for other Canadians.

Tags for Reconciliation: A movement of hope or a movement of guilt?

Carved wooden face